Showing all posts tagged ui:

Jukely Makes Going to Concerts Seamless


Jukely is a fascinating concept that’s going to change the concert/music industry in the metropolitan areas. Jukely allows subscribers to go to as many music shows as you want for $25 a month.

The UI is dead simple to use. You navigate left and right to see the list of shows and the selected artist’s music video starts playing on the right. Once you find the show you want to see, you grab a pass. That’s it. You can even connect to services like Rdio, Spotify, Last.fm and SoundCloud to get personalized recommendations on upcoming shows. This is also such a great way to discover and experience live music that would have been missed otherwise.

This seamless experience of not needing to think about purchasing a ticket and when to go is what they are trying to sell it seems — just as CDs progressed into MP3s and then into unlimited cloud streaming service. I would love to see this innovation move further into ticketing experience as well. Rather than having your physical or digital ticket scanned one at a time, you simply walk into the concert with your smartphone — similar to how you can purchase a product at the Apple Store with their mobile app and walk out after it’s been purchased.

I’m quite curious to see how they are or plan on dealing with users distributing screenshots of the ticket to others. Will they be checking IDs? Or whether you’ll be able to hand out a limited number of tickets to your friends if you are not able to go to many shows in a given month for whatever reason. I will share my thoughts here after my hands-on experience.


The concert matchmaking interface makes it easier for you to find your “date" via Facebook.

via Jukely

Designing UI for Phablet: Perhaps Menu Should Be at the Bottom

"In his analysis of 1,333 observations of smartphones in use, Steven Hoober found about 75% of people rely on their thumb and 49% rely on a one-handed grip to get things done on their phones. On large screens (over four inches) those kinds of behaviors can stretch people’s thumbs well past their comfort zone as they try to reach controls positioned at the top of their device."











via LukeW

How to Learn to Use Something

Smartphones and laptops seem so ubiquitous to us all. But in reality, the ubiquitousness we experience every day is based on a series of learned behaviors. Someone once said that, "The only intuitive interface is the nipple. Everything else is learned."

For example, using something as simple as magazine seems like a piece of cake, but in reality a series of interaction involved in using such object is quite complex — as depicted in the parody of iPad reader/ebook apps below created by Khoi Vinh.

Khoi Vinh and Andrew Losowsky poking fun at the failures of magazines on iPad



Often times, conjecturing up an image of known disposition to communicate how a system works is very effective. When Apple released Apple Macintosh 128k, an one of a kind personal computer ever released, Apple introduced a handful of mental models to help understand basic principles such as file system and page scrolling that were not clearly understood at the time.


Apple Macintosh manual - explaining how mouse works


Apple Macintosh manual - explaining how scrolling a page works


Apple Macintosh manual - explaining how file system works

Play Macintosh 128K Guided Tour Tape (1984)

Jon Wiley's Approach Towards Material Design



"We did it in order to come with the most simple solution. Try to design the simplest possible thing for the user first. See if you can get away with that. Prove you need more complexity before you're at it." -- Jon Wiley, Principal Designer, Google Search & Maps

Forgotten Moto 360 Watchface Design Entry



Here's my entry that I wasn't able to submit two days ago due to my illness… A bummer…

Anyway, I wanted the initial state of the watchface to be something organic, elegant and beautiful without hindering its ability to tell time. And most importantly, no gimmicky or techno-centric interfaces that alienate most wearers. This (falling cherry blossom petals) is one of the three in the series.


Below is a comment I received following my comment on the article posted on The Verge.